Inger Ekdahl ~ Screenprint

View image full screen View image full screen View image full screen

< Previous Next >

  • Inger Ekdahl ~ Screenprint
  • Inger Ekdahl ~ Screenprint alternative image
  • Inger Ekdahl ~ Screenprint alternative image

Inger Ekdahl (1922-2014)
Untitled Composition
c.1968
Screenprint (46 / 150)
Signed 'Inger Ekdahl'
30 x 23 ins / 75 x 57 cms
Ref.1401
Additional Works
To view other works by Inger Ekdahl please click Here

£1,350

Additional Information

Inger Ekdahl was born in Ystad on 7th February 1922. She was a Swedish artist.

Ekdahl attended Isaac Grünewald's painting school, Stockholm (1944) where she studied under Grünewald (before his sudden death in 1946). It was here that she met fellow artist Eric H. Olson. Ekdahl and Olson married in 1944 before attending the Otte Sköld School of Painting in Stockholm for a year in 1945.

In 1947, Ekdahl studied in Paris under André Lhote. During her time in Paris, Ekdahl and Olson became friends with the artists Hans Arp and Victor Vasarely. Ekdahl was also good friends with the legendary Parisian gallerist Denise René (1931-2012). Ekdahl and Olson fequently travelled to Zurich and northern Italy. They returned to Sweden in 1951.

Ekdahl¬ís first exhibited in Stockholm in 1947. Other solo exhibitions include Umeå (1950) and Verona, Italy, (1950). Ekdahl and Olson were both members of the The Salon des Réalités Nouvelles and, in 1950 and 1951, Ekdahl was selected to exhibit with them in Paris. In Stockholm, Ekdahl exhibited alongside the Swedish artist Rune Hagberg at Galleri Gummesons.

Inger Ekdahl died in Malmo in 2014 aged 92.

Following Ekdahl's death, her artistic estate was donated to the Ystad Art Museum who honoured her with a retrospective exhibition 'Konstruktioner i Samklang' in 2016. Examples of her works are also held in the collection of Modern Museet, Stockholm.

In his obituary of Ekdahl, the Swedish art historian and critic Thomas Millroth likended her to a Swedish Bridget Riley or Vera Molnar and said that 'in our country, she was completely unique... and is now waiting for her rightful place in art history'.